New Year’s Eve, Times Square, New York: The New Year Brings Hope


Dan Weiner, New Years Eve, Times Square, New York, 1951 (143.1992)


Dan Weiner, New Years Eve, Times Square, New York, 1951 (969.1974)


Weegee, New Year’s Eve, Times Square, New York, ca. 1945 (15654.1993)


Weegee, For a Happier 1945… To Her and to Millions… the New Year Brings Hope, January 1, 1945 (16279.1993)


Leon Levinstein, [New Year’s Eve, Times Square, New York], 1970 (2012.114.32)

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Merry Christmas from the ICP Archives


Charles PrattN.Y.C., 1962 (79.1996)


Lisette ModelWindow Shopping, New York City, 1962 (269.1983)


Harold Feinstein, Fourteenth Street Shoe Store Window, 1969 (607.1982)


Charles PrattN.Y.C., 1962 (72.1996)

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Vera Talbot: Xmas, 1924, Nara, Japan


Vera Talbot, [Travel Album through Asia, Southeast Asia, India, Africa, and Europe by Vera Talbot], 1924-26 (2009.32.68)

At the end of December, 1924, Vera Talbot and her party were tirelessly visiting the temples and shrines in Kyoto, Nikko, and Nara, happily feeding the sacred deer in Nara Park, and devotedly visiting the Great Buddhas: Nara Daibutsu (Vairocana Buddha, Todaiji Temple, Nara) and Kamakura Daibutsu (Great Buddha of Kamakura). The Kamakura Daibutsu is “a colossal copper image of Amida-butsu (Amitabha Buddha)… The fact that it sits in the open air makes it unusual amongst large Buddha statues in Japan. The Great Buddha, designated a National Treasure by the Japanese government, is some 37 feet tall and weighs around 121 tons. Kotoku-in.jp. (It doesn’t look like that Vera and friends went inside the sacred statue, as one can, “the interior is dark.”) The Great Kanto Earthquake destroyed the base of the Kamakura Daibutsu, created in the 13th century, and construction of a new base is visible in Vera’s photo.

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God Inc.

In 1990 photographer Carl de Keyzer rented a van and drove all across the United States. Several years earlier he had  created projects in India and produced Homo Sovieticus in the former Soviet Union. This time de Keyzer became fascinated by the importance of religion in America. More specifically, he saw a trend where God was used as a product in the American market.

During his travels de Keyzer kept a diary where he wrote about the different religious communities he encountered. In preparation of his journey he had written to six hundred organizations out of the existing 3,500 nationwide. In one of his diary entries he writes that “one of the nicest answers I received was surely that of Mother Divine” who “kindly invited [him] to join the consecration’ and dedication of the Woodmont estate ~ as House -of the Lord […].


Carl de KeyzerThe Father and Mother Divine Peace Movement, Holy Communion Banquet at the Circle Mission Church, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, September 1990 (44.1995)

As a photographer de Keyzer likes to use irony in his work -in part because he doesn’t take himself too seriously. At the same time it alleviates the subject of religion in people’s life.


Carl de Keyzer, The Living Christmas Tree, The Calvary Baptist Temple, Savannah, George, December 1990 (42.1995)

“[…] several large churches have living Christmas trees with up to 300 choir members as Christmas events. Special services, concerts and Christmas pageants depicting the birth of Jesus are held one or two weeks before Christmas. Sometimes even two (twin) trees are installed for special sound effects.”


Carl de Keyzer, The Father and Mother Divine Peace Movement, Holy Communion Banquet in Divine Tracey Hotel, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, September 1990 (51.1995)


Carl de Keyzer, The Father and Mother Divine Peace Movement, Holy Communion Banquet in Divine Tracey Hotel, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, September 1990 (46.1995)

In 1990 the W. Eugene Smith Memorial Fund awarded Carl de Keyzer an award for God Inc. He continues to work on prolonged subjects. Most recently he published work about life in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, known as North Korea. De Keyzer has been a member of Magnum Photos since 1994.

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“Water is Life”


Leonard Freed (1929-2006), The fire hydrants are opended during the summer heat, Harlem, NY, 1967 (404.1981)


Charles Pratt (1929-1976), Hoboken, 1963 (87.1996)


Charles Pratt (1929-1976), Hoboken, 1963 (86.1996)


Lou Bernstein (1911-2005), N.Y. City, 1977 (27.1992)


Lou Bernstein (1911-2005), South 3rd Street, Brooklyn, N.Y., 1947 (56.1992)


Todd Webb (1905-2000), La Salle St., Harlem, New York, 1946 (61.1985)

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“Surf Rocker” and “A Serious Case of Gold Fever” in Nome, Alaska: Photographs by E.A. Hegg


Eric A. Hegg (1867–1947), “A Serious Case of Gold Fever, Nome Beach, Alaska,” ca. 1900


Eric A. Hegg (1867–1947), “Rocking on Nome Beach, Alaska,” ca. 1900


Eric A. Hegg (1867–1947), “Surf Rocker, Nome Beach, Alaska,” ca. 1900


Eric A. Hegg (1867–1947), “Landing Passengers, Nome, Alaska,” ca. 1900


Eric A. Hegg (1867–1947), [Loading freight and passengers onto lightering scow from the beach during winter, Nome, Alaska], ca. 1900


Eric A. Hegg (1867–1947), “Beach Scene, Nome, Alaska,” June 1900


Eric A. Hegg (1867–1947), “Front St., Nome, Alaska,” ca. 1901

To begin at the end:
Eric A. Hegg, photographer, died in 1947. When the Klondike gold rush (1896–1899) ended, the Nome gold rush (approximately 1899–1909) began. At the end of the nineteenth and start of the twentieth century, gold was discovered on the beach in Nome, Alaska. Around thirty thousand of people hotfooted it to Nome; the population more than doubled. People lived in tents on the dark sandy beach along the Bering Sea. Apparently, “there was no place like Nome.” The relatively easy availability of gold (and at first, little equipment was needed) contrasted with the fact that the beach could only be mined from June to October. In the summer months, with 24 hours of daylight, the search for gold went on around the clock. (Presumably this was also advantageous for photography.) Entering and leaving Nome was at times troublesome, because there were no docks, nor a harbor. (There was no sewage system and clean drinking water was in short supply.) Of course the Nome gold rush was a disaster for native Alaskans and the environment. Hegg spent about two years, beginning in August, 1899, photographing in and around Nome. Although he photographed until his death, Hegg’s gold mining photographic practice ended in Nome.

These prints, made from the original glass plate negatives, were exhibited at ICP – “Alaska Gold Rush, The 1897–-1901 Historical Photographs by E.A. Hegg,” June 11 through July 18, 1976. It was one of many exhibitions to celebrate America’s bicentennial. In some ways these photos are an antecedent to photos in the current exhibition, “Generation Wealth by Lauren Greenfield.” Bookending the twentieth century, and located primarily, or at least initially, on the west coast of the United States, both exhibitions offer examinations of the pursuit of dough, bread, and Benjamins. Thousands of people hightailed it to the Klondike and Nome in an attempt to strike it rich, most were bitterly disappointed, fought or succumbed to frostbite or starvation, yet a few succeeded and became fabulously wealthy and left with lucre. And in the end, a few writers (Jack London) and photographers (here, our hero Hegg), created important artifacts and made much more than moola.


Eric A. Hegg (1867–1947), “Surf at Nome, Alaska,” ca. 1901

Sources, great links, and a pair of books:
University of Washington Library, Eric A. Hegg Photographs.
University of Washington Library, Digital Collections, Photographs.
University of Washington Library, Digital Collections, The Klondike Gold Rush.
Wikipedia: Nome Gold Rush.
City of Gold,” film.
The New York Times, “American Argonauts,” Marshall Sprague; August 27, 1967
The New York Times, “1920’s Revisited In 170 Portraits,” Jacob Deschin, December 17, 1967
Portland, Oregon: Binfords and Mort; Klondike ’98: Hegg’s Album of the 1898 Alaska Gold Rush, Ethel Anderson Baker, 1949
Seattle: University of Washington Press; One Man’s Gold Rush: A Klondike Album, Murray Morgan, photographs by E.A. Hegg, 1967

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Vera Talbot: Yokohama after the earthquake

Vera Talbot, [Travel Album through Asia, Southeast Asia, India, Africa, and Europe by Vera Talbot], 1924-26 (2009.32.68)

Around noon on September 1, 1923 a massive earthquake, the Great Kanto Earthquake, perhaps the worst natural disaster in Japan, killed over 145,000 people. Fires, including “a 300-foot-tall ‘fire tornado’” and floods, including a 39 foot tsunami, were devastating. Almost all of the buildings in Yokohama were destroyed, three that survived included the Yokohama three towers. The Yokohama Port Opening Memorial Hall, completed in 1917, is the tall structure in the photos. On September 3, 1923, The New York Times reported that “Yokohama is wiped out; Tokio in Ruins[…] Conflagrations Abate Only When Nothing is Left to Burn[…] People in Appalling Want.”

Vera Talbot’s around-the-world album gets off to a tragic start, the ruins of Yokohama, (visually similar to the ruins of Hiroshima), presumably made on December 16, 1924, a little more than a year after the earthquake.

The second page show some images made in Kyoto:

Vera Talbot, [Travel Album through Asia, Southeast Asia, India, Africa, and Europe by Vera Talbot], 1924-26 (2009.32.68)

Yokohama (Great Kanto) earthquake sources and links:
New York Times, March 13, 2011
New York Times, Sept. 3, 1923
New York Times, Sept.4, 1923
greatkantoearthquake.com
British Pathe
Brown University Library
Smithsonian Magazine
Earthquaketrack
britannica.com

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