Helen Levitt: “Why don’t we let people look at pictures.”


Helen Levitt (1913–2009), [Two girls on a truck], ca. 1948 (2006.55.2)


School is good. Helen Levitt speaking at ICP on June 17th 1987 about learning photography in the 1930s and 40s by asking the person working at the photography store questions and learning by trial and error, and that printing is a matter of long experience.


Helen Levitt (1913–2009), New York, 1972 (313.1984) 313.1984


Helen Levitt and Marvin Hoshino speaking at ICP on June 17th 1987 about color and context.


Helen Levitt (1913–2009), New York, 1980 (2008.38.1)


Helen Levitt and Marvin Hoshino speaking at ICP on June 17th 1987 about color and time.


Helen Levitt (1913–2009), New York, 1982 (146.1997)


Helen Levitt and Marvin Hoshino speaking at ICP on June 17th 1987 about Levitt’s beginnings as a photographer: working for a commercial photographer, Buster Mitchell, in the Bronx.


Helen Levitt and Marvin Hoshino speaking at ICP on June 17th 1987 about Levitt’s pink darkroom (“Helen has the only pink darkroom in the world.”), Levitt’s fondness for printing, and Helen Levitt compares black and white printing to eating peanuts.

Coinciding with the exhibition: Helen Levitt, “Children’s Street Drawings, New York, 1938-1948,” June 17, 1987 – July 26, 1987, Helen Levitt and Marvin Hoshino spoke at ICP, on June 17th 1987.

Helen Levitt born in Brooklyn on August 31, 1913 and died on March 29, 2009 in Greenwich Village.

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One Response to Helen Levitt: “Why don’t we let people look at pictures.”

  1. Fabulous selection Christopher. The phone booth photo is hysterical!

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