Weegee Wednesday: “17,000 pounds of black market potatoes seized from barbershop”

weegee_2325_1993
Weegee (1899-1968), [17,000 pounds of black market potatoes seized from barbershop, New York], May 20, 1943, (2325.1993)

weegee_13984_1993
Weegee (1899-1968), [17,000 pounds of black market potatoes seized from barbershop, New York], May 20, 1943, (13984.1993)

weegee_13985_1993
Weegee (1899-1968), [17,000 pounds of black market potatoes seized from barbershop, New York], May 20, 1943, (13985.1993)

Seventy two years ago today:

Potatoes au Bay Rum
If you think the potatoes you buy during the next few days smell like hair tonic, chances are they are part of the batch of 17,000 pounds Mayor LaGuardia, the cops, Market Dept. inspectors and the Office of Price Administration found in a midtown barbershop [Charles Barber Shop, 1221 Sixth Avenue]. Yesterday the jobber who brought them here agreed to sell them. They are being taken to Bronx Terminal market for distribution to retailers. The jobber is out on $300 bail for having put the potatoes in bags labeled wheat, oats and bran.
PM, May 20, 1943, p. 18

pm_1943_05_20_p18
PM, May 20, 1943, p. 18

pm_1943_05_20_p18-19
PM, May 20, 1943, p. 18-19

Potatoes with Aftershave Lotion might be a contemporary version of the title of this story. (“Bay rum is the name of a cologne/aftershave lotion. Other uses include as under-arm deodorant and as a fragrance for shaving soap, as well as a general astringent.” Wikipedia) Why in the world were there starchy, perennial nightshades in a midtown Manhattan barber shop? Why did Weegee take a few photos of the edible tubers leaving a midtown Manhattan barber shop? And why was this newsworthy? And why am I, 72 years later, making a mountain (of mashed potatoes) out of this molehill?
We wanted to get to the root of this potato mystery. Perhaps the best way to answer every question is to visit (or consult online) the New York Public Library… After spending a fruitful few hours planted in front of a microfilm reader in the The Microforms Section, Room 100, of the NYPL in Midtown Manhattan, we now know a little more about the spuds in sacks…

daily_news_1943_05_20_01_IMG_9034-2x2
Daily News, May 20, 1943
daily_news_1943_05_20_08_IMG_9051-2
Daily News, May 20, 1943 (NEWS foto)

Next! Some 18,000 pounds of tough-skinned potatoes, that haven’t even been shaved, get the vagabond’s rush from a barbershop at 1221 Sixth Ave. yesterday. The spuds, headed for a Bronx market, eventually will have their eyes picked out by New York housewives. City bought them. Benjamin Caplan, custodian of the potatoes, won a parole..$49.95 profit.

herald_tribune_1945_05_20_02_IMG_9169-2
New York Herald Tribune, May 20, 1943, p.20, Herald Tribune-Acme

Sixth Avenue Barber Shop Loses Its Potatoes
Some of the 17,000 pounds of potatoes found in the barber shop of Charles Falcone at 1221 Sixth Avenue on Tuesday being removed yesterday by Bronx Terminal Market wholesalers for resale to the city’s closed markets.

The wayward potato story was front page news in The Daily News and New York Herald Tribune, while The New York Post, covered the story, sadly with no photos. The Herald Tribune’s coverage was more digestible as it was a little more factual and less tongue-in-cheek.
(The photos published in the News and Tribune are uncredited, I guess that they were not made by Weegee.)
Apparently the potatoes, described as scarce, more valuable than diamonds, and vital to the war effort by Magistrate Anna Kross, were bought by Benjamin Caplan from a farm outside of Plattsburgh, New York, for 2 cents a pound (about 27 cents today) or $343.75 (about $4,663.91 today), where they were at risk of spoiling. Anthony Zubinsky drove them down to Manhattan, for $120 (about $1,628.13 today). Caplan asked his friend Charles Falcone, the barber, if he could store the spuds in Falcone’s barber shop while he tried to sell them, presumably legally, and not on the black market. Apparently unloading 157 bags of the scarce, luxury food, in mislabeled bags, in the middle of the afternoon in midtown Manhattan caught the eye and ire of passersby who notified the authorities. The authorities came raining down on the Charles Barber Shop. Mayor Fiorello La Guardia (1882-1947), with a chip on his shoulder, the Commissioner of Markets , the Commissioner of buildings, (due to the weight of the potatoes, the barber was charged with violating a building code), fire and police departments, and members of the press, descended on the Charles Barber Shop, on Sixth Avenue, near 48th Street.
Mr. Caplan appeared before Magistrate Anna Kross at the Jefferson Market Court. In the end, the Office of Price Administration exonerated Benjamin Caplan, he sold his spuds for a legal price, they were brought to the Bronx Terminal Market, and were sold at the city’s markets below the maximum of 6 cents a pound.
A quote, almost like dessert, from The Herald Tribune, May 20, 1943: “You probably never want to see another potato,” a reporter said to Mr. Caplan.
“I’ll be back up there tomorrow,” he replied wearily, referring to his upstate source of supply, “and if there aren’t any potatoes, I’ll get apples.”

Weegee Wednesdays is an occasional series exploring the life and work of Weegee.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Fans in a Flashbulb and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s