World War One @ One Hundred

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Unidentified Photographer, This man-age-81-lived in a cellar-with his wife-who was killed by a shell…, ca. 1916-1918 (2010.83.1)
Written with ink on verso: “Couchy-le-Chateau (This man-age-81-lived in a cellar-with his wife-who was killed by a shell in 1916, during the four years of war. Although he was within the line of fire-the huns did not evacuate him to a safe place-because his age would not permit him to work.
Photo made when he was en route to his little plot of land to try and raise a crop-amid the tangle of wire and shell-holes.”

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Unidentified Photographer, U.S. Infantry advancing to attack. Meuse-Argonne, September-November 1918 (2010.83.29)
Written with ink on verso: “Meuse-Argonne. U.S. Infantry advancing to attack. White smoke is the “creeping” barrage.”

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Unidentified Photographer, Meuse-Argonne, September-November 1918 (2010.83.30)
Written with ink on verso: “Meuse Argonne. A wrecked Church-used as an evacuation station for wounded.”

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Unidentified Photographer, Place de la Concorde, July 14, 1919 (2010.83.26)
Written with ink on verso: “Place de l’Concorde– July 14, 1919. One of the heavier long range terrors usually called “whiz, bangs” used as a means of viewing the Victory Parade. This type of special 210 m.m. cannon-fired a shell weighing about 250 pounds. Fitted with an extra false nose-in order to reduce the resistance-it had a range of nearly 20 miles.”

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Unidentified Photographer, A monument, July 14, 1919 (2010.83.16)
Written with ink on verso: “A monument of captured cannon at Rond Point. Ave des Champs Elysees, Victory Parade. July 14, 1919.”

The War That Will End War.

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