Centennial of Gerda Taro’s Birth, August 1, 1910

Unidentified Photographer, [Gerda Taro, Guadalajara, Spain], 1937

Gerda Taro, [Republican militiawoman training on the beach, outside Barcelona], August 1936

Gerda Taro, [Republican soldier playing the bugle, Valencia, Spain], March 1937

Gerda Taro, [Two Republican soldiers with a soldier on a stretcher, Navacerrada Pass, Segovia front, Spain], late May/early June 1937

Gerda Taro, [Burning truck, Battle of Brunete, Spain], July 1937

Gum Inc., Woman Photographer Crushed by Loyalist Tank, 1938

In her brief but dramatic career, Gerda Taro (1910–1937) made some of the most striking photographs to come from the front lines of the Spanish Civil War. A pioneering photojournalist, Taro combined the dynamic camera angles of New Vision photography with an emotional and physical closeness to her subjects. Her images were reproduced extensively in the French leftist press, along with those of her photographic collaborator and romantic partner, Robert Capa. While photographing the Battle of Brunete in July 1937, Taro was struck by a tank and killed. In honor of her heroism, Gum Inc. produced trading cards depicting her tragic death in the line of duty.

Upon her death, many of her prints and negatives remained with Capa. In 2002, Cornell Capa donated all of Taro’s prints (almost 300) to ICP, establishing the largest holding of her work anywhere; all of Taro’s negatives will be added to the collection as part of Cornell Capa’s bequest.

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About erinbarnett

Assistant Curator, Collections at the International Center of Photography, New York
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