Celebrating Martin Munkacsi

munkacsi_martin_2007_110_2320

Martin Munkacsi, [Fred Astaire], 1936 (2007.110.2320)

In his day Martin Munkacsi (1898-1963) was one of the most famous photographers in the world; his elegant and dynamic pictures of models, actors and athletes inspired photographers such as Henri Cartier-Bresson and Richard Avedon. His career began in Hungary as a sports photographer and he later moved to Berlin, where he worked for the magazines Biz, Uhu, Die Dame, and Vu. By 1934 he had made his way to New York, where he worked for Harper’s Bazaar. Munkacsi helped redefine fashion photography by having his models move naturally (often outdoors) instead of posing perfectly still, giving his images a vitality and informality previously unseen in fashion photography. Cartier-Bresson wrote of a Munkacsi photograph of three children running to the ocean, “I must say that it is that very photograph which was for me the spark that set fire to the fireworks . . . it made me realize that photography can reach eternity through the moment . . . ” After Munkacsi’s death Avedon wrote, “Today the world of what is called fashion is peopled by Munkacsi’s babies, his heirs.”

munkacsi_martin_2009_6_33

Martin Munkacsi, [Woman with peignoir], 1936 (2009.6.33)

munkacsi_martin_2009_6_23

Martin Munkacsi, [Katharine Hepburn, Hartford], 1935 (2009.6.23)

munkacsi_martin_2009_6_39

Martin Munkacsi, [Woman in rowboat], 1928 (2009.6.39)

munkacsi_martin_2007_110_2499

Martin Munkacsi, [Jeanette MacDonald swimming], 1930s (2007.110.2499)

About these ads
This entry was posted in Fans in a Flashbulb and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Celebrating Martin Munkacsi

  1. Pingback: Woman Sunbathing | “..it’s like a finger pointing away to the moon..”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s