“Here’s what the wind did to glamorous models in the window of Edith and Billie Bridal Salon, 271 Grand St.”


Weegee, “Here’s what the wind did to glamorous models in the window of Edith and Billie Bridal Salon, 271 Grand St.” September 15, 1944


PM Daily, September 15, 1944, pp. 13-14 (photos by Irving Haberman, Arthur Leipzig, and Weegee)

80-Mile Winds Lash the City as Hurricane Wreaks Damage Along Atlantic Coast
The most destructive hurricane since 1938 swept into three New England States today after touching New York and battering more than 800 miles of the East Coast, causing millions of dollars worth of damage and an undetermined number of casualties, including some deaths.
Following the same path as the 1938 storm which took 682 lives, the hurricane wrecked houses, destroyed crops, crippled communications and delayed transportation in seven states before moving into Connecticut, Rhode Island and Massachusetts.
The center of the disturbance by-passed New York, but winds of 80 miles an hour, the highest ever recorded in the city, tore through the streets for five minutes, while occasional gusts reached 95 miles an hour. Power and telephone lines were blown down, trees smashed and uprooted and transportation in many sections was brought to a standstill.
Other areas suffered the real destruction, however…
by Guy Rhoades

PM Daily, September 15, 1944, pp. 13-14

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